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OBSERVATIONAL STUDY TO UNDERSTAND THE PREVALENCE OF AAM LAKSHANA (SYMPTOMS OF AAM) IN VARIOUS DISEASES.
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Keywords

Aam, Prevalence, Samatva score, Correlation

How to Cite

NAWKAR, S. S., NAWKAR, M. S., & GINODE, A. G. (2019). OBSERVATIONAL STUDY TO UNDERSTAND THE PREVALENCE OF AAM LAKSHANA (SYMPTOMS OF AAM) IN VARIOUS DISEASES. Ayurlog: National Journal of Research in Ayurved Science, 7(06). Retrieved from http://ayurlog.com/index.php/ayurlog/article/view/423

Abstract

Introduction – Aam is unique concept in Ayurveda. Aam is important etiopathogenesis factor causing disease. One of the synonyms for disease is Aamay which is indicating the Aamodhbhav nature (originating from aam) of the disease. Thus, to find the correlation of Aam and the disease, this study was planned. Parallel prevalence of Aam symptoms were also traced in various diseases which are visiting to OPD, in day to day practice.

Methodology – 80 patients of various diseases visiting to OPD were selected randomly irrespective of demographic variables. The 10 symptoms of Aam mentioned by Vagbhata were observed.

The samatva score was calculated. Occurrence of each Aam symptom in all patients were noted.

Discussion – The samatva score was more than 50% is observed in 65% patients i.e. in 47 patients among 80.  As the nature Aam is guru, picchil, causing obstruction, 9 symptoms out of 10 were observed in more than that of 50% patients. The most prevalent symptom of Aam was Anilmoodhata.

Result – There is positive correlation between samtva associated with disease. The most common observed symptoms of Aam were Anilmoodhata & balabhramsha and the least common was Nishthiv.

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References

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2) Vagbhat - Ashtang Hridayam with Arundatta, Hemadri commentary, Chaukhambha Orientalia, Varanasi,
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7) Ibid P 955.
8) Ibid P 529.
9) Ibid P 1108.
10) Ibid P 164.
11) Ibid P 58.
12) Ibid P 789.
13) Ibid P 1053.
14) Ibid P 86.
15) Ibid P 436.
16) Vagbhat- Ashtang Hridayam with Arundatta, Hemadri commentary, Chaukhambha Orientalia, Varanasi,
Sutrasthan, Chapter 13, P 216.
17) Agnivesh, Charak Samhita along with Ayurved Dipika Commentary,Chaukhamba Sanskrit Sansthan
1984, P 517.
18) Narendranath Shastri – Madhavnidan with Madhukoshavyakhya, reprint 1993, Chapter 25, P 424.
19) Agnivesh, Charak Samhita along with Ayurved Dipika Commentary, Chaukhamba Sanskrit Sansthan
1984, P 442.
20) Narendranath Shastri – Madhavnidan with Madhukoshavyakhya, reprint 1993, Chapter 25, P 424.

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